Tag Archives: Richard Armitage

Exploring the Creative Process-Part IX: Interview with Abby Vegas

Just in time to bid farewell to another month and celebrate the release of her Lucas North-inspired novel, Clean Break, here’s our interview with Abby Vegas. abby_vegas
What type of environment do you need to write?
Someplace comfortable! In the summer I write on my screen porch, and in cold weather I write inside by the fire. Background music is a must for getting words on the page, but when I’m editing I usually prefer to work in silence.
How do your ideas come to you? Do you always write them or do you let them disappear?
Clean Break was my first novel and I drew inspiration from so many different places — movies, books, fairy tales, Spooks, real-life experience, and pure imagination. It took some time for the whole thing to come together. In the process I’ve absolutely let some ideas come and go. You can’t pack everything into one novel.
Do you plan a story from the beginning to end or start with an idea and let the chapters come to you as they do?
Clean BreakA little of both, although I think I veer closer to flying by the seat of my pants. With Clean Break I had a definite idea of where I wanted to start and finish, but how I’d get there was still a mystery when I started writing. The characters didn’t really come to life in my head until I had them on the page, talking and moving and thinking, making mistakes and learning from them. And some directions I initially took the story didn’t work, so I had to rethink my approach and try again.
 
Do you prefer writing easy, quick stories or long, layered stories?
 
Both! Short stories are a lot of fun because they don’t take two years to write (and edit and publish.) But there’s something very satisfying about a long-form story, too, and that’s why I wanted to try my hand at writing a novel. There’s freedom to explore in all that space, and I loved bringing in the secondary characters and taking time with some of the thematic elements.
 
Which do you find easier to write: dialogue or description – or are they equally hard/easy?
 
Writing dialogue is definitely easier for me. Description and introspection are a hard nut to crack – but it’s immensely satisfying to nail it, which I hope I do on occasion.
 
Is there anything that you won’t write or feel uncomfortable writing?
 
I wouldn’t say I *won’t* write it, but explicit sex scenes and erotica are not my forte. Given a choice, I’ll leave that to the experts.
 
What do you do to cure writer’s block? What advice can you give to new writers who might be scared to post their stories?
 
The only cure for writer’s block is to write. I’ve learned to embrace the wretched first draft as a necessary part of the process.
 
My advice to a new writer would be: start small. Try writing a one-shot fanfiction, post it on an appropriate site of your choosing, and see what kind of feedback you get. Then repeat the process. Fanfiction is an amazing point of entry for new fiction writers (I call it my gateway drug) because you have this built-in community of voracious readers and fans who are already invested in the characters and their stories. And connect with other writers in your genre! The fanfiction sites are an excellent resource for that kind of networking.
 
What is your favorite book and why?
 
Shining Through by Susan Isaacs — I’ve lost count of how many times I’ve read this novel. It’s a historical romantic spy-thriller chick-lit masterpiece with a kick-ass heroine. It’s just so good.
 
Abby´s Official Website:
http://www.AbbyVegasAuthor.com (includes bonus material for Clean Break + four nonfiction RA fandom adventures)
Twitter:
You can get her “Clean Break” at Amazon.com and AmazonUK.
 Visit Abby’s site and read the first ten chapters of the novel for free: FREE SAMPLE
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Exploring the Creative Process-Part VIII: Interview with Hazel Osmond

We’re bidding farewell to April with a new instalment in our Creative Process Series. This time it’s Hazel Osmond’s turn.

hazelWhat type of environment do you need to write?

It doesn’t have to be absolutely quiet, but it does have to be non-distracting. So somewhere with background noise is OK as long as it’s not too loud. If there’s music playing, it either has to be such a familiar song I’m not really tuning into it, or have no words at all.

How do your ideas come to you? Do you write them down or let them disappear?

In that time between waking up and being fully awake, I often get ideas come to me and usually I have to write them down, having learned that otherwise they flit away.  I like to go out for walks too because there’s something about the rhythm of walking that generates ideas or helps me sort out plot niggles. Those walking ideas stay with me till I can get to some paper.

Do you plan a story from the beginning to the end or start with an idea and let the chapters come to you as they will? 

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I plan, but not too tightly. So I’ll rough out chapters and know how the story will end and the major events along the way. I’ll also make sure I get any timelines right at this stage, so for example, if there’s a seventeen year old appearing in the present day story, I make sure I have birth dates and conception dates right. But it’s loose scaffolding rather than a tight plan. If I plan too much, when I come to write the whole thing, the freshness is gone. Often as I write, new twists and turns develop so there’s room for me to surprise myself.

Do you prefer writing easy quick stories or long, layered ones?

faceI don’t know if there is such a thing as an easy, quick story! I’m going to say that as a short story writer I do like the snapshot of a life it offers and the way it makes you use every word to the greatest effect. On the other hand, there’s something satisfying in drawing all the different threads of a complicated plot together … Sorry, I can’t decide!

Which do you find easier to write: dialogue or description or are they equally hard/easy?

Definitely dialogue. I’m always eavesdropping on conversations to make sure I get the rhythms right.

Is there anything that you won’t write or feel uncomfortable writing?

I would find it hard to write about child murder or violence against the vulnerable – I became much more sensitive to anything happening to children once I had my own.

What do you do to cure writer’s block? What advice can you give to new writers who might be scared to post their stories? 

The Mysterious Miss Mayhew appears courtesy of Hazel Osmond

The Mysterious Miss Mayhew appears courtesy of Hazel Osmond

Just try to keep writing in the hope that something good will emerge. Because I have spent years as a paid advertising copywriter, I have learned that you can’t wait for inspiration to show up, you just have to get the words on the page and work from there. Having said that, I had a break from writing last year following a number of deaths in the family – I needed the break from mining my own emotions to create emotional stories. Luckily it has passed and I’m writing again.

To new writers – if you’re really scared to post, find a good beta reader who can help you get your story in the best shape and then go for it. And then, well, try to put your fear in perspective … most people are kind and supportive and those who aren’t are really few and far between. And really, should you let what ‘might’ happen stop you from expressing yourself? No … do it!

What is your favorite book and why? grace

‘Vanity Fair’ by William Thackeray. Layered, complex plot; intrigue; love; battles and an amoral female protagonist in Becky Sharpe. A huge, witty, satirical blockbuster of a book!

 

 

 

Visit Hazel’s official site: www.hazelosmond.co.uk

Contact her on Twitter

Get her books from AmazonUs or AmazonUK.

EXPLORING THE CREATIVE PROCESS- PART I: An interview with Prue Batten, author of “The Gisborne Saga”

When Trudy and Julia invited me to join their blog last April, I was thrilled about the opportunity to collaborate on an endeavour that seeks to celebrate creativity within Richard’s fandom and acknowledge with a grateful nod the man whose wonderful characters have been an inspiring muse to budding and experienced authors alike.

Being a writer myself, I’ve always been interested in the process of creation and how it’s approached by my fellow authors. Although there are dozens of manuals in the market with tips and recipes to write a novel, there’s nothing like going to the source, the novelists themselves, to unveil the magic behind the stories and characters that invite us to dream, feel and think.

A few years ago, while writing for another fandom, I was asked some really interesting questions on my writing process, and they somehow made their way into my introductory interview for Armitage Authors. In the end, Trudy and I agreed on leaving them out and planned instead several articles to explore the topic with a few guest authors.

So, here we are at last, ready to share with you the first November instalment in a series of interviews devoted to published writers who’ve found inspiration in Richard’s work. I could write a long platitude about the lady that’s opening this series, but I’d rather leave her own words to speak for themselves.

Our gratitude to Ms. Prue Batten for granting our request at such short notice and being so generous with her time, and to Mindywho came up with these questions on Naughty-Seduction.net once upon a time.

Ms.Prue Batten

What type of environment do you need to write?

Just peace and quiet. I work in two separate places (city and coast) so have a little laptop that comes with me wherever I go. The amount of research I have to carry is a bit of an issue though and because I have neck issues, I also carry a wifi-keyboard and mouse so that I can set up a standing station when I need to.

How do your ideas come to you? Do you always write them or do you let them disappear?

Ideas come anytime, anywhere – often in the bath! And frequently, just before I go to sleep. I have a notebook and always try to record the idea before it becomes lost in the mists of time. One never knows when it will be handy.

Do you plan a story from the beginning to end or start with an idea and let the chapters come to you as they do?

I start with an idea and once the first couple of hundred words are written, I sit and create character profiles. After writing eight novels, I realize my characters tell me what they think should happen and I’m just a cipher. There is, however, a loose plan (perhaps one A4 page) which details the story outline, but it’s fairly flexible.

Do you prefer writing easy, quick stories or long, layered stories?

I prefer to write layered novels from between 90-110,000 words. It’s strange how the story arcs itself into exactly that amount of words without any deliberate effort on my part. However, I’m sometimes commissioned to write little short stories for a miniature book press and it’s like a quick shot of caffeine and really good practice in getting an idea across with the minimum of fuss!

Which do you find easier to write: dialogue or description or are they equally hard/easy?

I love both. When I write dialogue, it feels to me as if the characters are right by my side. They say what they want to say.

As for description, I adore it. It is the colour on a black and white etching. I have an affection for the late Rosamunde Pilcher’s work and she describes things from the soul. Gorgeous!

Is there anything that you won’t write or feel uncomfortable writing? 

I have a notoriously weak stomach and hate writing violent scenes. The difficulty is that my timeframe, the twelfth century, was indeed a violent era and to exclude it from a story would so wrong and would make the storyline one-dimensional.

What do you do to cure writer’s block?

To be honest, I’ve never really had what one would call writer’s block. I write all the time, no matter how I feel. For me, it’s a kind of blessed escape, like embroidery or walking on the beach. Maybe that’s the secret. Make it a part of your life.

What advice can you give to new writers who might be scared to post their stories?

I think the main thing is to have someone read the story first and give a totally unbiased opinion. If they say it needs work, don’t be offended. Ask them in what way and then go away and work on improvement. No story should ever be posted without the most basic requisite groundwork.

Then have a good hard edit. That might be from a capable friend, or you might pay for the service. It honestly does make a difference and it also respects the reader whom you hope will read your story.

It might seem a lot to do, when all you want is to post a story, but we have all been there and it was advice given to me before I published and I honestly did heed it. I wrote a trilogy when I first decided to write seriously and it sits in the office cupboard and will never see the light of day. I worked with a London consultancy on it for an extended period and it was truly my training ground. Lots of editorial reports and advice and I learned so much.

Just remember that you birthed your story and like giving birth to a child, you owe the story the best of care.

The only other thing I would say is never be impatient. Just take your time.

What is your favourite book and why?

I have a favourite author and I love all her work. She is the late Dorothy Dunnett and wrote fourteen historical fictions that are simply breathtaking. She is my icon for her wordage, her astonishing breadth of research and knowledge, her storylines and her stupendous imagination.

Visit Prue’s Official Website: http://pruebatten.com/

Get “The Gisborne Saga” and/or any of her works from Amazon.com and AmazonUK.

Love Is In The Air And So Is Danger: A Review of THE GISBORNE SAGA by Prue Batten

Prue Batten was the first writer from the Armitage fandom that I interacted with, during FanstRAvaganza2. She posted chapters of a fic to her blog, at the time called Mesmered, during that year’s celebration of fan creativity that retold the story of Guy of Gisborne through the eyes of a woman named Ysabel. It was completely addicting and I was a bit bereft when it was over because I had to know what became of them. Eventually that story became this series, The Gisborne Saga, and it’s still addicting. This was supposed to be up yesterday but I was again caught up in Prue’s beautifully told tale and I lost track of time.

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The phrase “sweeping epic romance” is frequently used to describe books that aren’t really but in this case it’s perfect. Ysabel de Moncrieff is living with cousins in France when her mother dies and her father sends his steward, Guy of Gisborne, to bring her home to England. They forge an uneasy bond on the journey that is strengthened when Ysabel saves Gisborne’s life. He spends the remainder of this book and the other two repaying that debt, and a few others of a different nature.

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This Gisborne is inspired by Armitage’s but he is as far from the slightly ridiculous BBC henchman as he possibly can be. He tells her stories to pass the time and Ysabel finds herself both fascinated and infuriated by this man who her father trusts with her safety. Guy sees no need to explain everything to her and so we find out when she does that his ambition is animated by a broken and bitter heart. This is not a “bad boy saved by the love of a good woman” story, though. The world they live in is far more complicated and they endanger each other as often as they save each other.

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Prue is also the author of the fantasy series The Chronicles of Eirie and she brings the lush world building from that setting to this one, a place we think we should know if we read Medieval romances. From the atmosphere in Le Mans after Henry II fled  to the rough passage of a small vessel in the Mediterranean the world we see through Ysabel’s eyes is incredibly vivid if confounding.  The political intrigue is tightly woven with the reality of being a woman who is seen as a commodity, something this woman won’t accept. Ysabel de Moncrieff is one of my favorite Gisborne heroines and spending time in her world, with the Gisborne that she loves, is absolutely worth it.

Prue Batten’s Gisborne Saga is archived here. Her four book cycle The Chronicles of Eirie is archived here. Miniature tales from the worlds in these books are available through Bo Press Books here. You can follow Prue Batten at her blog or on her Facebook page.

Love Is In The Air: To Sir, With Love

I kind of came into this fandom sideways, through fan fiction. I’d seen the proposal scene from North & South but hadn’t watched the whole thing and while I knew who Richard Armitage was I didn’t really engage with the fandom at all until I read a Guy of Gisborne fan fiction at FanFiction.Net. Tall, dark, and broken is a trope that really appeals to me so I sought out more fic and then the source material, the BBC’s retelling of Robin Hood. The fic that I read that night and the author who wrote it are long gone but I’d like to thank that writer for pulling me in.

Guy isn't really sure if he's thankful or not.

Guy isn’t really sure if he’s thankful or not.

Guy of Gisborne is not an easy character to love but it’s certainly fun to try. The bad boy who might be redeemed by the love of a good woman is nearly irresistible and when he’s wearing leather? All bets are off, especially in the hands of these writers.

Grant What I Wish by Nancy Klein at Wattpad. Marian recovers and heads back to Nottingham.

Love Is A Wound by Hazel Osmond at Wattpad. Guy becomes enamored of a woman who is decidedly not Marian.

A Lady’s Nightly Vigil of Love, a Sir Guy Ficlet by Gratiana Lovelace at Wattpad.

Manna From Heaven by Zee’s Muse at An Archive Of Our Own. NSFW Time travel involved with this one. Zee recently started posting a companion piece, Aside From Heaven.

The Dragon of Throxenby by Melanie Goldmund at the author’s website. All knights have to face a dragon sometime, right?

Sloth Fiction by Fedoralady at Wattpad. Is Guy really dead? Not if the amount of junk food disappearing from Fedoralady’s pantry is any indication. Multiple characters but she loves Guy best.

Remember by lillianschild at Wattpad. Remember the time Nottingham was going to be burned to the ground? Guy does.

How The Sheriff’s Guard Got their Feathers by Whatcatydidnext at Dreamer Fiction. Very silly. 🙂

Wolf’s Head by corrielle at LiveJournal. Follows Guy’s story from when he takes over Locksley Manor.

Second Chances by Nyphette at An Archive Of Our Own. Alternative Universe where Meg survives. WIP, at fifty-eight chapters.

So what’s your favorite Guy of Gisborne fan fiction? Leave a link in the comments and don’t be shy about linking your own work. One piece of housekeeping: the winner of The Tempest and My Lady Gisborne by Charlotte Hawkins was Jennie Colleen Newbrand, congratulations!

 

Love Is In the Air: A Review of THE TEMPEST

I first read The Tempest by Charlotte Hawkins a couple of years ago when it was still a stand-alone book and before the author spent months revising it into its current form. It was a good story the first time, but with the revision it has become more complex, with the back story fleshed out a little differently. The previous version was more fan fiction-y than this one, an extension of the universe of the BBC’s Robin Hood series though some details were changed. The revision goes even further. It is not necessary to have Gisborne as played by Armitage in your head as you read but the Guy on these pages still has enough in common with him that of course he’ll be there, along with a strong-willed Original Character, Cassia DeWarren.

Because, really, would you want to picture anyone else? Guy doesn't think so.

Because, really, would you want to picture anyone else? Guy doesn’t think so.

Cassia and Guy are each outcasts in their own ways. He’s still the hated and feared henchman of the Sheriff of Nottingham, of course, and she comes from a long line of healers. The dangerous charge of witchcraft haunts her family, setting up a rare moment where the reviled Gisborne performs an act of kindness that Cassia doesn’t forget.

One of my favorite romance tropes — the proud man humbled and dependent on someone he sees as an inferior — is a major plot driver and is played for laughs in a few instances. As the two characters bond over their losses and discover a mutual enemy, Cassia’s pride takes some hits, as well. Hawkins is particularly sensitive in describing the delicate balance between the relative freedom that has allowed Cassia to become the woman she is and the bonds of duty that threaten her budding romance with Guy. I absolutely rooted for Cassia as a character, especially when she was putting Guy in his place, and for them as a couple.

Does true love eventually win? There are as many scorching love scenes as there are fiery arguments between these two stubborn people, and there are two more books in the trilogy so whatever happens is bound to be a bumpy ride. Armitage Authors Network is giving away paperback copies of The Tempest and My Lady Gisborne,  the second book in Charlotte’s Gisborne trilogy, this weekend to one commenter on either this post or tomorrow’s interview with Charlotte Hawkins.

The Armitage Authors Network Interview With Catherine Winchester

We loved bringing you the sweet North & South romance “A Merry Little Christmas” this weekend and now The Armitage Authors Network is pleased to bring you our interview with the author, Catherine Winchester. We talked to her recently about Richard Armitage as an inspiration for her heroes, her writing process and what it’s like to market herself as an independent author.

Armitage Authors Network: Welcome to the blog, Catherine. Can you tell us a little about how you became a fan of Richard Armitage?

Catherine Winchester: Watching North & South. I’d been on a historical drama bend and having rewatched all my favourite classics, I looked for ones I may have missed. N&S had good reviews so I tried it.

AAN: What was it about him that’s been an inspiration to you as a writer – him as an actor, a particular character, etc.? How are your heroes inspired by him?

CW: I can’t say what it is about him that inspires me. All I can tell you is that to write a scene, I have to be able to see it, and he’s such a versatile actor that he’s very easy to picture in a myriad of different roles.

AAN: You’ve published two North & South novels, one a continuation of Gaskell’s story and one a time-travel romance. Can you tell us a little about the difference between writing John Thornton as the husband of Margaret Hale in Northern Light and John Thornton as the employer and suitor of modern woman Carrie Preston in What You Wish For?

CW: They were very different, actually. For Northern Light, I wanted to focus on Margaret’s desire to affect change among and for the working classes, something that John came to see the logic in too. The Victorian era was full of social change as many in the ruling classes sought to improve things for the working classes. The Victorians brought in the first laws governing things such as child labor and working hours, they made education compulsory and they gave the working man the vote, so it was an era of huge social change. The whole story was built around John and Margaret’s desire to build a “model village” for their workers, which I based on the village of Saltaire. Saltaire was built in 1851 by Titus Salt on the river Aire, hence Salt-aire. He wanted to provide his woolen mill workers with decent living conditions and although there were older model villages, Salt’s was in the same time period, region and in a similar industry.

Northern Light: A Sequel to North & South by Catherine Winchester

Northern Light: A Sequel to North & South by Catherine Winchester

I also had to stay true to the social mores as they were written by Gaskell. Her writings are very clean, morally speaking, and I had to honor that, despite my historical research painting a very different light of the times. One example is sex. Much Victorian literature ignored it completely and it is just assumed that both men and women were virgins on their wedding night. Actual figures for illegitimate births and pregnant brides show that at nearly fifty percent of women had sex before marriage. Prostitution was the second biggest employer of women, second only to being a servant and syphilis infected one third of the armed forced and 10% of the general population in metropolitan regions. In addition, birth control was available in the form of condoms made from animal intestines, sea sponges soaked in vinegar, quinine or olive oil, vaginal douches and even diaphragms, usually called rubber pessaries. Advertisements for such devices appeared in many publications of the time but it’s worth remembering that few people could read in the 1850s, so only the educated could access them as proved by the difference in birth rates between the working and upper classes. Many examples of such devices still exist in medical museums.

Clearly there was a lot more sex being had than the Victorians would have us believe but aside from a brief mention of there being ways to impede pregnancy and a doctor’s advice to stop ‘marital relations’ when Margaret’s pregnancy faces complications, I never touch on the subject of sex in Northern Light. The Victorians were also very hypocritical with sex though, assuming that men would seek sex and while that was frowned upon, it was acceptable, while a woman who was discovered having premarital or extra marital sex was a pariah.

What You Wish For by Catherine Winchester

What You Wish For by Catherine Winchester

In What You Wish For, I have a modern day female heroine who has obviously lived by our modern social mores and isn’t a virgin. I felt that I had to address this in some respect as it was probably one of the biggest differences in how we live our lives and likely, the most shocking thing about how modern British women live to a man from the Victorian era. I also gave John a past that would be in keeping with the times, he isn’t a cad or a bounder, but he isn’t a virgin either. Then of course, it was fun to explore some of the other differences between then and now in things such as medicine. The Victorians actually knew very little about the human body, for example many doctors still believed in bloodletting as a treatment and cure and they believed that bad smells transmitted disease and caused infection. Ignaz Semmelweis, the first doctor who suggested that doctors and surgeons should wash their hands in between patients and wear clean aprons — they wore dirty ones as a sign of their good trade — died in disgrace, a broken man.

So yes, the approach to each was very different but as an author, both were rewarding.

AAN: You’re incredibly prolific, can you tell us a little about your writing process?

CW: It stems from insomnia. I’ve had trouble sleeping since I was a child and it only got worse with adult problems. While I lie there, rather than replay events or worry about things, I have always created stories to distract myself. Once I began to write, certain scenes would plague me night after night, until I purged them by writing them down, then the next night, the story could move on in my mind.

AAN: You write in several genres, do you have a favorite?

CW: Honestly, it’s speculative fiction, sci-fi and fantasy type, but while my works in that area have been well received, they aren’t big sellers. I like all the genres I write in though, or I wouldn’t write them.

AAN: You’ve been very open about having dyslexia. How has that affected the way you write?

CW: It stopped me for many years. I would write stories in school feeling as proud as punch but they came back covered in red ink. They never commented on the story, only the spelling and grammar used to tell it, so I ended up thinking the whole thing was rubbish.

I kept creating stories in my head though and then I discovered Star Trek tie-in novels. I didn’t even know fan fiction existed but began to craft stories around my favourite TV shows of the time, which back then were Star Trek: The Next Generation and Quantum Leap. I would write stories based on them in spiral bound notebooks then later, on my school computer. I never showed them to anyone though, I didn’t see the point. When I finally got a home PC, I discovered fan fiction and began to post a few stories, they were in email groups then, rather than on a specific site. I’d moved onto Buffy the Vampire Slayer by then.

I think the internet was generally a nicer place back then and everyone was supportive and appreciative of my efforts. I don’t recall my spelling mistakes ever being brought up back then. Slowly, I learned how to better craft and pace my stories, and I’ve taught myself far more about spelling and grammar than my school was ever able to teach me. It still took over 10 years before I felt ready to try writing an original book.

AAN: What was the first piece you published?

CW: The first book was Past Due, part one of a vampire series. There are five planned, of which I’ve written three.

Past Due by Catherine Winchester

Past Due by Catherine Winchester

AAN: What made you decide to publish independently rather than through a publishing house?

CW: I sent the book to publishers and while I had a couple reply asking for the full manuscript, it went nowhere. But the book was written and just sitting there, doing nothing, so I looked into self-publishing. I had nothing to lose by that point, and my family rallied around to help me edit and proof it. I taught myself to use GIMP graphics program (which is open source and free) and bought stock photos for the cover.

The Reluctant Duchess, written by Catherine Winchester and narrated by Eva Hathaway

The Reluctant Duchess, written by Catherine Winchester and narrated by Eva Hathaway

AAN: How did the audio version of The Reluctant Duchess, narrated by Eva Hathaway, come about?

CW: I’d heard about it, it’s another amazon company, basically self-publishing for audio books with the royalties usually split 50/50 between author and narrator. You can also pay a flat fee to the narrators. It was a very new thing for me as I was expected to critique the version and make changes. Considering that I knew nothing about audiobooks and voice work, it was very uncomfortable for me, but I was lucky to have picked someone who seemed to know what she was doing and she did a very good job. When I can face it, I intend to turn my other books into audio books too because with the 50/50 royalty split, you have nothing to lose.

AAN: You do all the marketing on your books, can you explain to our readers a little about what’s involved in that?

CW: I have tried almost every marketing trick going and have found that very few of them actually pay dividends for the time involved. The best promotional tool I’ve ever used is Amazon’s Select’s free program. For every three months you agree for your eBook to be exclusively with Amazon, you can give it away for free for five days. I know it sounds counterproductive but it really does encourage new readers to give your book a chance, which results in reviews on your page, sales of your other books,assuming they liked what they read, and recommendations to their friends and family. A lot of people tie their Amazon and Goodreads accounts to Twitter, so purchases and reviews automatically appear on their Tweets.

Other than that, I’ve rounded up my personal experiences with other marketing ideas on my blog.

You can find Catherine Winchester’s books on Amazon here.  Her books are archived here under the tabs John Thornton, Armitage Inspired Heroes, and Other Works by Armitage Authors. Follow her on Twitter @CatWAuthor and on Facebook here. She also blogs at Catherine Winchester.